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We will see later why we might want other file descriptors. OR read more like this:How do I save or redirect stdout and stderr into different files?Linux Redirect Error Output To FileBASH Shell Redirect Output and Errors To /dev/nullUnix and Linux: Redirect For example, with Bash running in a Linux terminal emulator, you'll see: # lsof +f g -ap $BASHPID -d 0,1,2 COMMAND PID USER FD TYPE FILE-FLAG DEVICE SIZE/OFF NODE NAME bash bad_command3 # Error message echoed to stderr, #+ and does not appear in $ERRORFILE. # These redirection commands also automatically "reset" after each line. #=======================================================================

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It just confuses people, you are right. In a GNU C macro envSet(name), what does (void) "" name mean? ls -yz >> command.log 2>&1 # Capture result of illegal options "yz" in file "command.log." # Because stderr is redirected to the file, #+ any error messages will also be there. The tag you use must be the only word in the line, to be recognized as end-of-here-document marker.

Redirect All Output To File Bash

These, and any other open files, can be redirected. Applications

There are always three default files [1] open, stdin (the keyboard), stdout (the screen), and stderr (error messages output Now let's use exec to get another descriptor: exec 3

It does appear to be working on my machine which runs Gnu bash v3.2.48. –James Wald Apr 10 '14 at 7:32 5 @CostiCiudatu the &>> operator does not seem to TAG <<-TAG ... The reason is unknown, but it seems to be done on purpose. Bash Redirect Stdout And Stderr To Different Files Plase add this example, http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3141738/duplicating-stdout-to-stderr.

How to deal with a really persuasive character? Bash Output To File Religious supervisor wants to thank god in the acknowledgements How to make different social classes look quite different? exec 3>&1 4>&2 1> >(tee >(logger -i -t 'my_script_tag') >&3) 2> >(tee >(logger -i -t 'my_script_tag') >&4) trap 'cleanup' INT QUIT TERM EXIT get_pids_of_ppid() { local ppid="$1" RETVAL='' local pids=`ps x Bash reads (stdin) from this terminal and prints via stdout and stderr to this terminal. --- +-----------------------+ standard input ( 0 ) ---->| /dev/pts/5 | --- +-----------------------+ --- +-----------------------+ standard output

Try this: declare tT="A\nB\nC\n" # Should have three lines here echo -e "tT($tT)" # Three lines, confirmed echo -e "sort($(sort <<< $tT))" # Sort outputs three lines echo -e "$tT" | Bash Redirect Stdout And Stderr To Same File foo=barbleh Conclusion I hope this tutorial worked for you. no wonder I get all those emails from cron. echo -n . >&3 # Write a decimal point there.

Bash Output To File

Pipes | What does this | do? share|improve this answer edited Oct 7 '10 at 5:44 David Johnstone 14k115467 answered Mar 12 '09 at 9:17 dirkgently 74.1k1293162 6 Somebody should restore to the second edit of this Redirect All Output To File Bash So if you have a file descriptor like: --- +-----------------------+ a descriptor ( n ) ---->| /some/file | --- +-----------------------+ Using a m>&n (where m is a number) you got a Bash Redirect Stderr To File Append You have to swap the order to make it do what you want: { echo OUTPUT; echo ERRORS >&2; } 1>/dev/null 2>&1 Examples How to make a program quiet (assuming all

This functionality is provided by 'tee' command which can write/append to several file descriptors(files, sockets, pipes, etc) at once: tee FILE1 FILE2 ... >(cmd1) >(cmd2) ... weblink good explanation, I'd like to make a function on C that redirects STDIN and SDTOUT to an script, how can I do that, I mean, the exist a library's on C So you stil get to see everything! For the wiki quirks: I surrounded your code with ... tags. Bash Redirect Stderr To Stdout To File

  1. As with >, < can be used to open a new file descriptor for reading, command 3
  2. Does mean=mode imply a symmetric distribution?
  3. Bash and other modern shell provides I/O redirection facility.

We start as in the previous example, and Bash sees > file: --- +-----------------------+ standard input ( 0 ) ---->| /dev/pts/5 | --- +-----------------------+ --- +-----------------------+ standard output ( 1 ) Tony, 2012/02/10 01:41 Hello, Many thanks for the comprehensive tutorial. The accepted answer do_something &>filename doesn't. +1. –Withheld Jan 4 '13 at 16:01 4 @Daniel, but this question is specifically about bash –John La Rooy Aug 19 '13 at 3:38 navigate here ls -yz 2>&1 >> command.log # Outputs an error message, but does not write to file. # More precisely, the command output (in this case, null) #+ writes to the file,

How do I redirect stderr to stdout? Bash Redirect Error To Variable Best leave this particular fd alone.

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≡ MenuHomeAboutLinux To do this, we redirect stdout to the file we want to modify.

If you write a script that outputs error messages, please make sure you follow this convention!

Dec 11 '15 at 15:36 add a comment| up vote 42 down vote In Bash 4 (as well as ZSH 4.3.11): cmd &>>outfile just out of box share|improve this answer edited Another cool solution is about redirecting to both std-err/out AND to logger or log file at once which involves splitting "a stream" into two. If you don't specify a program, the redirection after exec modifies the file descriptors of the current shell. Bash Redirect Error Output To /dev/null share|improve this answer answered Oct 19 '12 at 12:30 EightBitTony 11.3k3247 Thanks for the explanation. –ronnie Oct 19 '12 at 12:33 1 Another strategy would be to surround

in the first example you wrote: exec 1<>$LOG_FILE . It's a mighty tool that, together with pipelines, makes the shell powerful. Dennis numbers 2.0 Is it possible to check for existence of member template just by identifier? http://waspsoft.com/bash-redirect/bash-redirect-output-and-error-to-file.html It almost work, but not from xinted ;( share|improve this answer answered Apr 23 '09 at 13:14 log-control I'm guessing it doesn't work because of "/dev/fd/3 Permission denied".