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It is in form of boolean values, with 0 for success and 1 for failure. Since the same variable get expanded to different values on different computers. If quitting CMD.EXE, sets the process exit code with that number.That's exactly what I was looking for!Thanks a lot!Works like a charm!Gabor Logged billrich Guest share|improve this answer edited Oct 1 '10 at 5:27 answered Oct 1 '10 at 4:58 Dennis Williamson 57.4k10100135 I tried your code. navigate here

Here's a good summary of the pitfalls and subtleties. –Nick Westgate Jun 17 '15 at 6:18 | show 1 more comment up vote 6 down vote This really works when you devcomApprenticeThanked: 37 Re: How to return success/failure from a batch file? « Reply #8 on: September 10, 2008, 01:12:38 AM » you can use:Code: [Select]&& if success
|| if failexample:Code: [Select]set rem setlocal set dofoo=yes set i=0 :STARTLOOP if "%i%"=="17" goto EXITLOOP if "%ERRORLEVEL%"=="%n%" set dofoo=no set /a i = %i% + 1 goto STARTLOOP :EXITLOOP if "%dofoo%"=="yes" foo But as Andrew if not exist c:\lists.txt exit 7 if not defined userprofile exit 9 exit 0 Let’s assume we have another file called App.cmd that calls Find.cmd first.

Batch File Error Code 2

Old Forum Search | Forum Rules Copyright © 2013 Computer Hope All rights reserved. Logged To every complex question there is a simple answer and it is wrong…- H.L. This was presumably because… The test for inequality is nice to have because the pseudo-environment-variable gives an easy test for equality: IF "%ERRORLEVEL%"=="%N%" Mathematically speaking, the two are equivalent, though; given I'll have to go back and fix it because the "greater than or equal to" behavior was expected but won't happen due to my mistake. [It's fine to rely on the

But since the DOS command to determine the return code is IF ERRORLEVEL, most people use the name errorlevel. Maybe cmd.exe builtin set could set its exit value to the value passed in instead of setting the environment variable when the variable being set in is named ERRORLEVEL? Now, if the Find.cmd returns an error wherein it sets the errorlevel to greater than 0 then it would exit the program. Return Error Code From Batch File Use ‘exit /?' for help.

rem this next command sets the error level to zero CMD /C EXIT 0 set ERRORLEVEL=1 if ERRORLEVEL 1 echo Does this print? But you can't change directories by saying set CD=C:\Windows. Now I know my ABCs, won't you come and golf with me? What are the canonical white spaces?

I have a program that returns -1 on errors). Batch File Check Error Code I just happened to have finished writing a batch script that was getting ready to go into production using the latter that worked simply because of the fall-back nature of the share|improve this answer answered Apr 19 '13 at 5:07 Sam Jones 4631718 3 it could be even better if you returned the same error back to app1. share|improve this answer edited Aug 9 at 16:11 Dave Jarvis 16.3k24105204 answered Dec 2 '08 at 18:07 Samuel Renkert 6,80821626 17 If you're running directly from a Windows command line

Batch File Error Code 255

For example, the diff program has three exit codes: 0 means the files are the same; 1 means the files are different; 2 means that something terrible happened. Join them; it only takes a minute: Sign up Get error code from within a batch file up vote 26 down vote favorite 5 I have a batch file that runs Batch File Error Code 2 Use ‘exit', perhaps as ‘exit /b'. Batch File Error Code 1 CMD.exe allows you to set it but then from that point on the variable is mostly meaningless.

If we need to check every errorlevel, though, there are better alternatives. check over here Myron A. A very simple way to halt on error is to use the EXIT command with the /B switch (to exit the current batch script context, and not the command prompt process). Adopt A Jet/Book Were slings used for throwing hand grenades? Batch File Error Code 3

Logged To every complex question there is a simple answer and it is wrong…- H.L. So "errorlevel 0" will match everything. If executed from outside a batch script, it will quit CMD.EXE exitCode specifies a numeric number. his comment is here A successful command returns a 0 while an unsuccessful one returns a non-zero value that usually can be interpreted as an Error Code.

Another possible cause is that either gdi32.dll or user32.dll has failed to initialize. Batch File Get Error Code if you use Code: [Select]if errorlevel gtr 0 exit /b [1] anything over errorleve==1 would exit with exit code 1FB Logged Next time google it. More details may be available in Windows Event log.Start Program / ApplicationRun DOS / Cmd CommandStart TaskIf you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact our support team.Solutions Simple

So i created a little bash script to take care of this.

The last command executed in the function or the script determines the exit status. Could someone please help with these questions:How do I return 0 for success ate the end of an MSDOS batch file?Similarly, how do I return 1 (or other values) representing erroneous eddie says: September 27, 2008 at 8:14 am you know, Go To Statement Considered Harmful. Batch File Exit With Error Code It took me a little while to figure out that ERRORLEVEL wasn't a normal environment variable.

start /wait something.exe echo %errorlevel% share|improve this answer edited Sep 3 '15 at 18:38 anatoly techtonik 6,92715067 answered Jul 13 '12 at 18:57 Gary 1,70511115 14 Thanks a lot for A very helpful feature is the built-in DOS commands like ECHO, IF, and SET will preserve the existing value of %ERRORLEVEL%. I've just seen it working for > start /wait notepad.exe –dmihailescu Jan 23 '13 at 18:48 1 Great answer! weblink It's just a variable whose name happens to coincide with a command processor concept.

Tags Code Comments (15) Tom says: September 26, 2008 at 10:06 am Oops. A solution to do it in C++ looks like below: #include "stdafx.h" #include "windows.h" #include "stdio.h" #include "tchar.h" #include "stdio.h" #include "shellapi.h" int _tmain( int argc, TCHAR *argv[] ) { CString How's the CMD trip bonuses from extra legs work?